Facts About The Beach


The beach used to be a place where only bad things happened. According to The Smithsonian – a terrific magazine – prior to the eighteenth century the beach was characterised in mythology and the Bible as a place where solely crappy things occurred. Natural disasters, pirates, diseases, shipwrecks, and the general wrath of the Gods (or God). Think a lot of Shakespeares plays, to be honest and you will have the idea.

Any number of women who escort Benidorm men for cash, as well as amateur females have had the experience of sex on the beach. And it is never, ever as good as you would expect. Sand gets everywhere and ruins you for days afterward. It is cold, uncomfortable and because it is public there is very little chance to get up to anything too exciting.
The beach used to be prescribed by doctors. The beach became a popular destination during the Industrial Revolution in Britain, largely because doctors prescribed it to their well to do patients. From late in the nineteenth century doctors thought that beach waves could help fight the black bile which built up in peoples spleens, which was supposed to cause depression. Wow.
The beach has in modern times – the post second world war era in particular – become a centre of fun and frollicks. Having a sun tan used to mark you out as a peasant, while being white meant you were refined. But that all stopped when it became fashionable to have a su tan to show that you were healthy and sensual. And after From Here To Eternity with Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr it became thought of as a romantic place for sex as well. Yeah, well, not so much really. 
But for females, it was often pretty crappy. In “The Lure Of The Sea” by Alain Corbin, the historian writes about the beach being used as an especially aggressive medical treatment to toughen up young ladies who appeared to fragile. The “bathers” would force the female patients into the sea just as the wave broke, being careful to hold their heads down so as to increase the sense of drowning. Nice. Medicinal drown proofing.

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